Cultural Heritage in Danger: Illicit Trafficking, Armed Conflicts and Cultural Diplomacy, 9 June 2017, Canterbury (UK)

On 9 June 2017, Kristin Hausler participated in the conference on Cultural Heritage in danger: illicit trafficking, armed conflicts and Cultural Diplomacy, at the Canterbury Cathedral Lodge, which was organised by the Center for Heritage, University of Kent. Her presentation focused on the EU’s diplomatic response to ‘cultural heritage in danger’, highlighting the two key areas in which the EU has taken initiatives in that regard, namely the combat of trafficking and the safeguarding of cultural heritage. She presented the three forms of actions through which the EU has addressed those issues: (1) legislation, with the two Council Regulations restricting the import of cultural goods from Iraq and Syria respectively;  (2) programmes and partnerships (whether focused on cultural heritage or including cultural heritage matters); and (3) financial support to other organisations, such as to UNESCO’s Action Plan for Syria with the funding of the Emergency Safeguarding of the Syrian Cultural Heritage project, which includes the Observatory of Syrian Cultural Heritage. She concluded by presenting ‘Towards an EU Strategy for international cultural relations’, a document which was adopted in June 2016, following the Preparatory Action on ‘Culture in EU External Relations’ (2013-2014). This strategy, which should be launched in 2018, the first European year of Cultural Heritage, focuses on cultural heritage in danger as it contains a number of specific actions to be implemented to combat trafficking and strengthened the protection of cultural heritage. With regard to trafficking, it includes a legislative proposal to regulate the import into the EU of cultural goods, based on the results of a recently launched study to identify gaps in national legislation, and measures associated with the Action Plan for strengthening the fight against terrorist financing. As for the safeguarding of cultural heritage, it includes actions aimed at sharing satellite imagery of cultural heritage sites at risk with, inter alia, UNESCO through the Copernicus Emergency Management Service, in order to evaluate damage and plan possible reconstruction, for example.

Full programme available at the University’s website.

Photos: Kristin Hausler (presenting) and Kristin with the conference’s keynote speaker Dr Artemis A. Papathanassiou (former Chair of the UNESCO Intergovernmental Committee for the Protection of Cultural Property in the Event of Armed Conflict, Senior Legal Advisor, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Greece).

New HEURIGHT publication by Hanna Schreiber

We are pleased to announce that our new HEURIGHT paper, authored by Hanna Schreiber and entitled ‘Intangible cultural heritage and soft power – exploring the relationship’ has just been published in the International Journal of Intangible Heritage.

Abstract:

This article presents the ‘soft power’ concept (Joseph Nye) and explores its relationship with the concept of intangible cultural heritage. Its main points of reference are thus the UNESCO 2003 Convention on the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage, the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity, as well as two chosen ‘soft power’ rankings: Soft Power 30 and the Elcano Global Presence Index. Member states of the European Union, as well as countries occupying important places in these rankings like the United States, the United Kingdom or China are of particular relevance. The author points out that a new kind of discourse has emerged alongside the ‘Authorised Heritage Discourse’ (Laurajane Smith) – the ‘Intangible Heritage Discourse’. She argues that UNESCO plays the role of an arbiter in both of these discourses, and subsequently analyses their possible impact on the position of particular countries in the ‘soft power’ rankings.

The 4th Heritage Forum in Kraków, 1-2 June 2017

Hanna Schreiber, from the Polish research team, acted as as a keynote speaker at the 4th Heritage Forum in Kraków, 1-2 June 2017. The Heritage Forum of Central Europe is a cyclical, biennial event organised by the International Cultural Centre in Kraków. It constitutes an interdisciplinary platform for meetings and discussions on the relations between the past and the present informed by the broad understanding of heritage as ‘meaningful pasts that should be remembered’ (Sharon Macdonald). The aim of the fourth edition was to discuss and analyse a reciprocity between heritage and society, as well as their mutual engagement. What is society’s attitude to heritage – its meaningful but often difficult past? How does heritage shape communities? Who owns heritage and why? What are the social functions of heritage?

Plenary lectures were delivered by internationally acclaimed scholars: Professor Sharon Macdonald, Professor Robert van der Laarse, and Professor John Tunbridge. Additionally, the conference participants had an opportunity to attend parallel lectures delivered by several keynote speakers, including i.a.: Tamás Fejérdy, Sophia Labadi, Ioannis Poulios, Pavel Vařeka, Magdalena Vášáryová and Hanna Schreiber who delivered a lecture titled: ‘Intangible Cultural Heritage, Europe and the European Union – Exploring the Relationship’. Hanna also chaired the panel devoted to the relationship of heritage and communities.

Forum’s programme is available here.

More information can be found on the Forum’s website.

Photo gallery:

 

‘Shaping Identities. Challenging Borders. Photographic Histories in Eastern and Central Europe’, 9-11 May 2017, Prague

Ewa Manikowska, from the Polish research team, served as a member of the Advisory Board of the international conference, titled ‘Shaping Identities: Challenging Borders. Photographic Histories in Eastern and Central Europe‘, held on 9-11 May 2017, at the Institute of Art History of the Czech Academy of Sciences in Prague. The Institute of Art of the Polish Academy of Sciences, a member of HEURIGHT research consortium, was one of the co-organizers of this event.

A follow up to the highly successful international conference ‘Discovering “Peripheries”: Photographic Histories in Central and Eastern Europe‘ (see our news published on 1 June 2016), which was hosted by the Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw, in 2016, the event in Prague aimed at challenging established limits within histories of photography. It asked how local circumstances affected the production, dissemination and reception of photography in the societies of Central and Eastern Europe, and how those interacted with trends and developments from abroad. The conference also included a round-table discussion and several workshops on the issues of keeping, managing and digitising photographic collections.

Conference programme is available here.

More information can be found at the conference webpage.

See photo gallery.

HEURIGHT Conference ‘Cultural Heritage in the European Union: Legal Perspectives and Contemporary Challenges’, 20-21 April 2017, Warsaw (Poland)

On 20-21 April 2017, the Research Team of the Project HEURIGHT held its second conference, which was entitled Cultural Heritage in the European Union: Legal Perspectives and Contemporary Challenges. The event, also organised in cooperation with the Editorial Board of the Santander Art and Culture Law Review, took place at the Institute of Art of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw (Poland). Its main objective was to present and debate the research which has so far been completed within the framework of the HEURIGHT project. The conference gathered experts to discuss how the right to access or enjoyment of cultural heritage, as a human right, is understood and implemented within the European Union. The various presentations analysed the complex organisational and regulatory frameworks concerned with cultural heritage and human rights in place within the EU, as well as their interaction, cross-fertilisation, and possible overlaps. Topics covered included: the notion of shared or common cultural heritage, cultural landscapes, intangible cultural heritage, digitisation, the cultural heritage of minorities, migrants’ cultural rights, the financing of cultural heritage, education and the concept of common heritage and history, the mobility of professionals, national treasures, cultural diplomacy, and culture in the EU trade agreements. Proceedings from the conference will be the object of an edited volume, to be published in 2018.

Programme and abstracts.

Photo gallery: HEURIGHT_20-21April2017.

Media will be available shortly.

Research mission to the EU institutions in Brussels, 2-6 April 2017

On 2-6 April Hanna Schreiber, a member of the Polish research team, visited the EU institutions in Brussels within the framework of her research on the relationships between EU law and policy, UNESCO’s action and the 2003 Intangible Cultural Heritage Convention. In particular, she visited the UNESCO Liasion Office and the Secretariat of the CULT Committee in the European Parliament and took part in the screening of the movie ‘The Destruction of Memory’, marking the World Heritage Day. She conducted interviews with the members of diverse EU institutions in relation to the future of intagible culture heritage in Europe and in the EU, an international, regional organisation.

Final programme confirmed: HEURIGHT Conference ‘Cultural Heritage in the European Union: Legal Perspectives and Contemporary Challenges’, 20-21 April 2017, Warsaw (Poland)

We are pleased to announce the final programme of the second HEURIGHT Conference Cultural Heritage in the European Union: Legal Perspectives and Contemporary Challenges. The event, organised in cooperation with the Editorial Board of the Santander Art and Culture Law Review, will be held on 20-21 April 2017 at the Institute of Art of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw (Poland). Its main objective is to present and debate the research already undertaken within the framework of the project. Accordingly, the conference aims to discuss how human rights guarantees in relation to cultural heritage are being understood and implemented in the European Union (EU) and in its neighbouring countries. Acknowledging the changing and often contested nature of the right to cultural heritage (or more precisely the right to access or enjoyment of cultural heritage), it will endeavour to map how this right’s evolving content affects the forms of protection, access to, and governance of cultural heritage, within the institutional, operational and legal structures of the EU. In particular, it will deal with the complex organizational and regulatory frameworks concerned with cultural heritage and human rights in place in the EU Members States, as well as their interaction, cross-fertilization, and possible overlaps.

See: